Highpointe Employees Charged Following Hidden Camera Investigation

Continuing to make use of hidden cameras during investigations, Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman announced charges against 17 employees of Highpointe on Michigan Health Care Facility in Buffalo, NY. The charges are based on video footage recorded by the Attorney General’s Office that allegedly reveals the neglect of a 56-year-old resident. According to the press release, “nurses failed to dispense pain medication and check on the resident,” and “aides neglected to check on the resident, failed to give him liquids and failed to perform incontinent care.” In addition, the video footage also revealed that the nurses and aides falsified documents to cover up their alleged neglect.

The resident of Highpointe, who had Huntington’s disease and was bedridden and unable to walk, was fully dependent on the facility’s staff. The Attorney General announced that his office “will use every tool in our arsenal…to ensure that nursing home residents receive the care they need and the respect they deserve.” Many residents of nursing homes, like the 56-year-old resident of Highpointe, do need someone to provide a watchful eye over their care. While the owners of nursing homes should be the ones to provide this oversight, many times, their lack of oversight adds to or causes neglect and abuse.

The Attorney General’s Office continues to demonstrate that it will be a watchful eye in nursing homes. In a previous blog post, I wrote about surveillance in nursing homes, and the Attorney General’s Office’s use of hidden cameras back in 2010. With advancements in technology, it is arguably becoming easier to oversee the care provided in long-term care settings. I am hopeful that the Attorney General’s commitment to oversight, coupled with his office’s willingness to use technology, will set an example for nursing home owners and the public throughout New York State.