Prescription Drug Use in the U.S.

Overmedication is a big issue in long-term care facilities, especially nursing homes. I was sent the following infographic on the state of prescription drug use in the U.S. by Emily Parker of Healthcare Management Degree Guide. The graphic showcases some interesting data pertaining to antibiotics, psychiatric drugs, stimulants and painkillers. While this information doesn’t focus specifically on the nursing home population, it does highlight a trend of increasing prescription drug use throughout the country. Be sure to check the blog over the next couple of weeks for a follow-up post on overmedication in nursing homes.Over-Prescribed America
Source: Healthcare-Management-Degree.net/

Medicare Annouces Changes to Nursing Home Rating System

On October 6, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced changes to the rating system used for nursing homes. These changes, which will start to be implemented in 2015, include focused survey inspections for a nationwide sample of nursing homes, quarterly electronic reporting of staffing data, the use of additional quality measures, improved requirements for nursing home inspections, and an improved scoring methodology.

CMS hopes that the changes will improve the rating system, leading to better care. The agency writes that the survey inspections, which will start in January, 2015, will “enable better verification of both the staffing and quality measure information that is part of the Five-Star Quality Rating System.”

The press release states the new system for the electronic reporting of staffing data “will increase accuracy and timeliness of data, and allow for the calculation of quality measures for staff turnover, retention, types of staffing, and levels of different types of staffing.” My past post on staffing levels mentioned that the number of staff and the hours of care they provide are important to the quality of care a resident receives. In a New York Times article, Katie Thomas quotes Brian Lee, executive director of Families for Better Care, who said, “If we are able to get better information on staffing levels, the higher the quality is going to be in the long run.”

CMS is not only looking to improve current quality measures, but also adding additional measures to the rating system. Beginning in January, 2015, the rating system with take into account the use of antipsychotic medications by residents. According to Thomas’ article, 20.3 percent of long-term residents of nursing homes are given antipsychotic medications. With the changes, instead of merely being reported, the percentage of residents given these drugs will play a role in each nursing home’s rating. In the future, ratings will also take into account other measures, including claims-based data on re-hospitalization and community discharge rates. These new inclusions, along with a revision of the scoring methodology of the rating system, could produce noticeable changes in nursing home ratings.

I have blogged about issues with the five star rating system in the past. When researching ratings, self-reporting and the manipulation of data have made it difficult to decipher the actual quality of care provided by a nursing home. It seems that CMS has proposed these changes with the goal of addressing these issues in mind. Only time will tell if the new rating system will be effective. However, these changes seem to be a step in the right direction. In addition, CMS demonstrates that they are aware of the issues and are responding to calls for change.

While writing this post, I was wondering why CMS does not have a section of their website dedicated to consumer reviews and ratings. Today, almost everything (movies, restaurants, hotels, etc.) is rated by consumers. Anyone who has access to the internet can rate and review a product in just a few minutes. While residents and family members can file complaints with the New York State Department of Health, if they have issues with a nursing home, to my knowledge, there is no option to rate or comment on the quality of a nursing home on Nursing Home Compare. A cursory Google search revealed some websites that allow individuals to rate and comment on nursing homes, including http://www.aplaceformom.com/, https://www.senioradvisor.com/, and https://www.ourparents.com/. Consumer reviews should always be taken with a grain of salt, but reviews from individuals with firsthand knowledge of nursing homes can provide a valuable insight into their quality.

Attorney General’s Hidden Camera Investigation Leads to Arrests

Two days ago, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced that another hidden camera investigation has resulted in the arrests of nursing home employees. Two certified nurses’ aides, who worked at Erie County Medical Center Skilled Nursing Facility (also known as Terrace View Long Term Care Facility), were arrested and charged with “Falsifying Business Records in the First Degree (class E felony), Endangering the Welfare of an Incompetent or Physically Disabled Person (class A misdemeanor) and Willful Violation of Public Health Laws (unclassified misdemeanor).”

According to video footage, the CNAs, Donna Laury and Nakeia Green, allegedly neglected to follow a 79-year-old resident’s personal care plan, “failing to use two people when performing incontinence care and failing to use a mechanical lift to transfer the resident.” The employees are accused of falsifying documents to cover up their alleged neglect.

Due to Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and the inability to get around on her own, the 79-year-old resident relies on nursing staff to assist with daily activities. Many nursing home residents are in similar situations, where their well-being depends on the care of others. While many residents do receive the care they need, there are many instances, including this one, where caretakers are neglectful or abusive, and do not provide proper care. What is it about the culture of a facility that lends itself to this type of behavior?  And is it evidence of a systemic problem?

Magician, Mat Franco, Wins America’s Got Talent

I am very pleased to learn that a magician, Mat Franco, won America’s Got Talent (a variety talent competition) on September 17, 2014. Magic is something that is best seen live, which makes his win all the more impressive. You may be wondering why I am blogging about a magician on a blog devoted to advocating for the elderly in long-term care facilities. Magic, both performing and watching, is a passion of mine. I have often thought about donating my time to perform in nursing homes. I intend to do that this winter with my wife, Christine, who is a balloon twister. I am curious to find out how those with cognitive deficits react to magic. We could all use a little mystery and wonder in our lives, regardless of age.

When selecting a nursing home, it is important to make sure there are many activities for residents, especially for those with dementia. You want to ensure that your loved one has access to activities in which they can participate and enjoy. A social worker can assist you in determining what activities are best.