Do Staffing Levels Affect Quality of Care?

Back in January of 2006, the Office of the Attorney General released a report titled “Staffing Levels in New York Nursing Home: Important Information for Making Choices.” This report, although dated, has some interesting information regarding nursing home staffing levels in New York State, as well as recommendations to consider when searching for a nursing home.

While there are multiple factors that determine the quality of care in a nursing home, staffing levels are an important one. The number of hours of care provided to a resident and quality of care show “a strong relationship.” In New York State, staffing levels in a nursing home are usually measured in “the average number of hours of daily care that staff members provide each resident of the home.” This measurement is commonly referred to as “hours per resident day,” and is “calculated by adding up the total number of hours worked by the nursing staff and dividing it by the number of resident-days during the reporting period.”

A study done by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) found that quality of care declined once staffing levels fell below three separate thresholds. Once the amount of care provided by Registered Nurses (RNs) fell below 0.75 hours per resident day (45 minutes), quality of care declined. If RNs and Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) together provided less than 1.3 hours per resident day (1 hour, 18 minutes), the quality of care suffered. In addition, quality of care started to decline when Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) provided less than 2.8 hours per resident day (2 hours, 48 minutes). These thresholds mean that any nursing home in New York must provide at least 4 hours and 6 minutes of total nursing care, for the quality of care not to suffer.

The level of care provided to residents also should take into account specific needs of residents. If residents have special needs, they may need additional care and a nursing home may need to employ additional staff. Additional care may be required when residents are pediatric, have suffered traumatic brain injuries, have AIDS, are on ventilators, are on respite care, or have behavioral needs. With any of these cases, additional care is necessary, and nursing homes must ensure that their staff can provide the necessary and proper care.

When considering which nursing home you or a loved one should choose, keep in mind that staffing levels are only numbers. The Office of the Attorney General also recommended prospective residents and their loved ones:

  • Visit the home and look around
  • Learn about the management and staff, including the level of turnover
  • Speak with caregivers
  • Speak with others who have experience with nursing homes, including knowledgeable professionals

These recommendations should be part of any nursing home decision.

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