Attorney General’s Hidden Camera Investigation Leads to Arrests

Two days ago, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced that another hidden camera investigation has resulted in the arrests of nursing home employees. Two certified nurses’ aides, who worked at Erie County Medical Center Skilled Nursing Facility (also known as Terrace View Long Term Care Facility), were arrested and charged with “Falsifying Business Records in the First Degree (class E felony), Endangering the Welfare of an Incompetent or Physically Disabled Person (class A misdemeanor) and Willful Violation of Public Health Laws (unclassified misdemeanor).”

According to video footage, the CNAs, Donna Laury and Nakeia Green, allegedly neglected to follow a 79-year-old resident’s personal care plan, “failing to use two people when performing incontinence care and failing to use a mechanical lift to transfer the resident.” The employees are accused of falsifying documents to cover up their alleged neglect.

Due to Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and the inability to get around on her own, the 79-year-old resident relies on nursing staff to assist with daily activities. Many nursing home residents are in similar situations, where their well-being depends on the care of others. While many residents do receive the care they need, there are many instances, including this one, where caretakers are neglectful or abusive, and do not provide proper care. What is it about the culture of a facility that lends itself to this type of behavior?  And is it evidence of a systemic problem?

Highpointe Employees Charged Following Hidden Camera Investigation

Continuing to make use of hidden cameras during investigations, Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman announced charges against 17 employees of Highpointe on Michigan Health Care Facility in Buffalo, NY. The charges are based on video footage recorded by the Attorney General’s Office that allegedly reveals the neglect of a 56-year-old resident. According to the press release, “nurses failed to dispense pain medication and check on the resident,” and “aides neglected to check on the resident, failed to give him liquids and failed to perform incontinent care.” In addition, the video footage also revealed that the nurses and aides falsified documents to cover up their alleged neglect.

The resident of Highpointe, who had Huntington’s disease and was bedridden and unable to walk, was fully dependent on the facility’s staff. The Attorney General announced that his office “will use every tool in our arsenal…to ensure that nursing home residents receive the care they need and the respect they deserve.” Many residents of nursing homes, like the 56-year-old resident of Highpointe, do need someone to provide a watchful eye over their care. While the owners of nursing homes should be the ones to provide this oversight, many times, their lack of oversight adds to or causes neglect and abuse.

The Attorney General’s Office continues to demonstrate that it will be a watchful eye in nursing homes. In a previous blog post, I wrote about surveillance in nursing homes, and the Attorney General’s Office’s use of hidden cameras back in 2010. With advancements in technology, it is arguably becoming easier to oversee the care provided in long-term care settings. I am hopeful that the Attorney General’s commitment to oversight, coupled with his office’s willingness to use technology, will set an example for nursing home owners and the public throughout New York State.